Tag Archives: 3D printing

Technology and the Art World

The age of robots is quickly approaching if not already here, and it may pose a threat to aspiring artists. There are two technological advances that will have a particular impact on the art industry: Virtual/Augmented Reality and Artificial Intelligence.

Virtual Reality devices provide fully immersive experiences that allows users to personally interact within a computer-generated, three-dimensional environment. Virtual Reality is not limited to video games. Graphic Designers may want to take a look into this, not only for game design but also for social media platforms and educational platforms. Videographers ought to consider adapting to this trend by training themselves on how to use 360° cameras. Painters may want to have a go at Google’s Tilt Brush, which allows you to paint inside a virtual reality. Augmented Reality devices allow users to function in the real world, supplemented by computer-generated information. There are an increasing number of exhibitions that allow viewers to interact with art pieces that ‘come to life’ through augmented reality with their smartphone. Those who like to stick with traditional mediums may want to consider using augmented reality to show photographs of their artworks at multiple galleries at the same time.

Machines with Artificial Intelligence function in ways normally thought to only be associated with human minds. For example, some AIs are self-learning or are able to understand human speech. What does this have to do with artists? Well, people have created algorithms that allowed them to 3D-print an original painting that looked exactly like a Rembrandt.

Scared now? But Artificial Intelligence cannot possibly encroach on the beauty of the human soul…can it? Take a look at Cozmo, an AI robot designed to mimic human emotions. Of course, this robot is not the end-all-be-all; but neither were flip-up cell phones. It may not be impractical to predict that one day, AI will be able to do everything that we artists can do.

A few consoling thoughts; I expect that ours would be one of the last occupations to be replaced by AI, considering how challenging it is to quantify emotions and personalities. I also imagine that after the robot-craze over digital realities, autonomous vehicles, 3D-printers and AI, people may look once again to the value of the ‘human touch’ and the raw, natural world. Humans are flawed, and we may need to be prepared to market that aspect of ourselves; our struggles are what makes us unique – what makes us beautiful.

It is very important for us artists to begin asking ourselves how we are going to adapt to this increasingly technological world. Once upon a time people bought from whatever artists were in the local area. Now, people can buy from any artist they like via the internet, making it all the more challenging for each one of us to stand out among millions of other artists. How exactly do we do that?

Let me explain one approach with a personal experience of mine. Two summers ago in Anchorage, Alaska, I found a very nice handmade belt with native designs on it, made by a man who called himself Ziggy. We talked briefly about our lives, and he told me that he painted most of the murals in Anchorage, learned more than 100 trades throughout the course of his life, and ran for mayor of Anchorage 3 times. After I bargained the belt down to $75, I watched him finish making it by customizing it to fit my waist. Had I seen the same exact belt for sale at Macy’s, I would never have bought it in a million years. But I got a handmade Alaskan belt made by a man with a scraggly beard who ran for mayor three times – I do not regret a thing.

There is a saying that people do not buy artwork – they buy the artist. Marketing one’s artwork on social media is just the beginning. One needs to market their personality, their character, their visions, and even other passions. Our art is not the only thing that has to be relatable; the more relatable you as a person are, the easier it becomes to make exchanges.

In summary, current technological advances have as huge an impact on our industry as any other. I strongly encourage other artists to think critically about how they can adapt to current and incoming trends in order to share their individual gifts and insights to the world.

 

This is a rough-draft article expected to publish on The Stillman Exchange sometime in the near future.

Healthcare-Sciences Cohesive Research Findings

After researching the various technologies disrupting the healthcare and science industry, a video has been made to compile all of the findings of the healthcare-sciences team. The technologies discussed in the final presentation video are IBM Watson, 3D printing, tissue engineering, and genetic modification. Each new piece of technology offers a different way in how people’s lives will be impacted, however all bring about changes to the social system society has set in place. Changes include how long people are now able to live for, an increased ability to detect diseases, reduce risk during organ transplants, and assist those struggling with disease. The video is posted above but please refer here to discover the team’s research findings.

The Future of 3D Printing and its Societal Impacts

This blog post is about the ways in which 3D printing technology will advance and the overall societal impact that it will have. I discuss the ways in which nanotechnology and 3D printing are coming together to produce object such as nano-robots and complex circuit architecture. I continue by discussing the ways in which the theoretical creation of nano/molecular assemblers will change the way humanity relates to matter and with each other. An organization called the Open Source Nano Replicator Initiative is planning on creating a molecular assembler that will build molecules from atomic raw materials, and then chemically bond these molecules together on top of each other to create an object. They believe that this will have effects on humanity that are unprecedented because molecular assemblers in the hands of everyone would theoretically end scarcity of matter in our reality. Additionally, I discuss the ways in which 3D printing can currently be used for consumers and manufacturers to corroborate on objects to “debug” and perfect them similarly to the way a software company releases a beta of their product to be tested by consumers.

Sources:

The Societal Impacts of 3D Printing

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ricksmith/2015/07/07/5-incredible-trends-that-will-shape-our-3d-printed-future/

http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=34275.php

http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=37541.php

Legal Issues of the 3D printing of Organs

The main legal issues that I focused on are over the ownership of the artificially created organs as well as the implications that 3D printing has on the black market sale of organs. The main conclusions that I found were that there is a possibility that the data file of a person’s organ could have split ownership between the subject is came from and the doctors/scientists that transformed it into a data file. The other conclusion that I found pertained to the possible effect that it would have on the black market for organs. The unlimited replication potential will help cause the supply to increase of organs, which will lower the incentive for people to head to the black market in the first place to get an organ. Currently, people wait on donation lists- but some people decided that the black market sale and transplant is more worth their time. The increased supply of organs would alleviate some of demand on the black market because people will be less desperate, but there still remains an issue of getting the organ transplanted by a professional doctor.

Sources:

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/the-dark-side-of-3d-printing-10-things-to-watch/

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-02/hm-nlp020614.php

http://www.organovo.com/

https://sites.google.com/site/3dprintingorgans/legal-ethical-and-security-issues

https://www.skadden.com/insights/intellectual-property-issues-stacking-3-d-printing

Tissue Engineering


Tissue Engineering has become a major disruption in the health care industry and the hope is that one day we will no longer need organ donors. Tissue engineering is a form of regenerative medicine which combines “scaffolds, cells, and biologically active molecules into functional tissues.” The use of tissue engineering in everyday medical practices will ultimately lead to people living longer and healthier lives. This huge advancement will move the healthcare industry away from the need for lab animals, and with the help of 3D printing they will be able to recreate living organs in a petri-dish. Tissue engineering is transforming the way doctors look at the future, with this new disruptive technology anything is possible.  This video explains what tissue engineering is, how it works, a little bit of the history, and lastly how it has become a disruptive technology!

For more information on tissue engineering, below are links of articles I shared in the video!
https://www.ted.com/talks/nina_tandon…
http://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/scien…
http://report.nih.gov/nihfactsheets/v…
http://www.wakehealth.edu/News-Releas…
http://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/learn…
http://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/
http://www.dhti.cmu.edu/dhti/definiti…

3D Printing and Modern Medicine

3d printing is disrupting the way reconstructive surgeries are carried out as well as the way doctors understand the problem in a specific region of a patients body. However, there are still many revolutions to be made with 3D printing in the medical field- especially in the field of organ transplant alternatives.