The Fourth Industrial Revolution: An Introduction

Over two hundred years ago the life for the average person was relatively the same for generations. Peasants or serfs tilled the farmland of their fathers and grandfathers for generations. That all changed with the use of steam and water to help mechanize the production process. Soon goods could be transported faster and farther with steam ships, coal could be mined more efficiently, and food stuffs increased. This was the first Industrial Revolution. Now two hundred years later there had been two subsequent industrial revolutions. One involving mass production of goods and another one involving the automation of production through computers. With each transition to a different industrial revolution the world order was shattered. The balance of European governance changed with ushering in of the first industrial revolution and the french revolution. The mighty empires of Europe began to crumble as the second industrial revolution came to end. With the beginning of the third industrial revolution the United States of America stood as the sole superpower on the planet as the communist nations in Eastern Europe dissolved. Now we are on the cusp of the fourth industrial revolution. What new transitions do we expect to see in the coming years as technology changes every aspect of our way of life.

Our team has been looking into how this fourth industrial revolution has had an effect on our current education system. It is interesting to see how little education has changed over time, even with our unprecedented access to technology and information like never before. The traditional classroom still looks the same and professors still lecture at students without much variation from the beginning of education. There are some recent changes that have slowly shifted the way education is used and these changes can be summed into three categories: the content effect, the technology effect and the access effect. These categories cover how education is being forced to change because standardized testing is no longer satisfactory. Professors must integrate technology and mass amounts of content into their classes and while doing this they foster an environment for team building and out-of-the-box learning. Even with these changes, there is still so much improvement to be done within the education industry and we would like to further explore the disruption across universities and how this will also overlap into employers educating employees.

The fourth revolution will affect everyone, young or old. It will change the way things are done whether we are ready for it or not. It is important we focus on the future, so we know how youth of the world will be directly affected? A forecasting article we read talked about how education will change in the next 5 years. Relating this article back to the World Economic Forum, teachers and employers need to take charge of training for the future. A video published last year talks about all changes we will see in the coming years. The technology showcased in the video will change the way we see our world and our world educators need to catch up to help aid future students.

 

Teachers and employers need to realize disruptive change and become educated in order to teach the future. Today we are currently in a transition period, classes like DT&L in the Lab below the Library is the future. The future of education in the classroom is broken down into five parts. One, grades and assignments will be done online, this will limit the number of paper and open accessibility. Two, Group projects will be done over collaborative external sites such as slack, good drive etc. Three, classroom portals will be open to the class in order to post and respond. Four, students will use cloud storage instead of flash drives or paper to store their work. Last, teachers, parents, students, and administrators communicating via social media platforms designed specifically for education. The last point is extremely important because everyone is on the same page now, the world is so much smaller. Education for the future is all about keeping open channels for communications and constantly staying educated on change. We hope that throughout this semester that we can expand on these ideas and prepare our generation for the future.

 

,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply